Calendar

Calendar (18)

Grand Prix of Qatar

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TRACK DATA

01 Qatar

Pole position : Left
Length : 5.380 m
Width : 12 m
Corners : 16 (10 right, 6 left)
Longest Straight 1.068 m
Constructed 2004

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Losail International Circuit is located approx. 30 km from
Doha International Airport and approx. 20 km from Doha City Centre.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 25°28'59.09"N, 51°27'22.89"E

HISTORY

Losail International Circuit (also Lusail International Circuit) is a motor racing circuit located just outside in the town of Lusail, north of Doha, Qatar.
Built in just under a year by 1,000 workers at the cost of $US 58 million, the track opened in 2004 to the inaugural Marlboro Grand Prix of Qatar, won by Sete Gibernau. In addition the circuit hosted the 2006 Grand Prix Masters of Qatar won by Nigel Mansell.
The track is 5.380 km in length, with a main straight of just over a kilometre at 1,068 metres. It is surrounded by artificial grass to stop the sand encroaching on the track. It happens to be somewhat similar to the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir.
In 2007, Losail added permanent outdoor lighting for night races. At the time, the lighting of the Losail Circuit by Musco Lighting was the largest permanent venue sports lighting project in the world, a distinction that now belongs to another Gulf motorsport venue, Yas Marina Circuit in Abu Dhabi. The first night race in MotoGP history was the Commercialbank Grand Prix of Qatar in March 2008.

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Gran Premio Motul de la Repùblica Argentina

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TRACK DATA

02 Argentine

Pole position : Left
Length : 4.805 km
Width : 16 mts
Corners : 12
Longest Straight : 1.070 m
Constructed 2008

LOCATION

Termas de Río Hondo, Santiago del Estero, Argentina

HISTORY

Autódromo Termas de Río Hondo is a motorsport circuit located in Termas de Río Hondo, Argentina. The circuit was created in 2007 and underwent a complete overhaul and rebuild process in 2012, based on design by the Italian circuit designer Jarno Zaffelli.[1] The circuit hosted the third round of the Argentine motorcycle Grand Prix in 2014 and 2015, bringing Grand Prix motorcycle racing back to Argentina after fifteen years.[2] In 2013, the circuit also hosted Rounds 15 and 16 of the FIA WTCC Race of Argentina of the World Touring Car Championship, and the first MotoGP and Moto2 official tests.[3][4] The track was to host the Argentine motorcycle Grand Prix in 2013,[5] but the government's nationalisation of the local subsidiary of Repsol S.A., and the ensuing cancellation of gas exports to Argentina raised concerns for the safety of the Honda MotoGP team that is sponsored by the Spanish oil company, forcing a one-year postponement.[6] In previous years, the circuit has also hosted events in the TC2000, Turismo Carretera and Formula Renault series.

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Red Bull Grand Prix of The Americas

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03 AustinTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length: 5.513 m. / 3,426 miles
Width: 15m
Left corners: 11
Right Corners: 9
Longest straight: 1.200 m. / 0,746 miles
Constructed: 2012

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Elroy, Texas, 12 miles (19 km) south of Austin, Texas

HISTORY

Circuit of the Americas (COTA) is a unidirectional, grade 1 FIA specification 3.427-mile (5.515 km) motor racing facility located in Elroy, on the southeastern periphery of Austin city limits, in Central Texas. COTA plays host to the Formula One United States Grand Prix. The circuit also hosts the Motorcycle Grand Prix of The Americas, a round of the Road Racing World Championship, commonly known as MotoGP, the FIA World Endurance Championship, as well as the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship. It previously hosted the Australian V8 Supercars series, the American Le Mans Series, and the Rolex Sports Car Series in 2013.
The circuit and Grand Prix were first proposed in the middle of 2010. The circuit was the first in the United States to be purpose-built for Formula One. The layout was conceived by promoter Tavo Hellmund and 1993 Motorcycle World Champion Kevin Schwantz with the assistance of German architect and circuit designer Hermann Tilke, who has also designed the Sepang, Shanghai, Yas Marina, Istanbul, Bahrain, Yeongam, and Buddh circuits, as well as the reprofiling of the Hockenheimring and Fuji Speedway. The circuit has FIA Grade 1 license.

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Gran Premio Red Bull de España

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04 JerezTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 4,423 m
Width : 11 m
Corners : 13 (8 right, 5 left)
Longest Straight 607 m
Constructed 1986
Modified 2002

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Jerez Circuit is located approx. 18 km from the Jerez Airport and approx.10 km from the Jerez City Centre. To access the Paddock and P1, P2, P TV and VIP Village Parking Areas use CIRCUIT ACCESS 1 only.

GPS Circuit Entrance - Access 1:36°42'43.59"N, 6°2'8.45"W

HISTORY

The circuit opened on 8 December 1985. During 1986 the circuit hosted the first international motorcycle event in Spain in March and the Formula One Spanish Grand Prix in April. The circuit's relatively remote location hindered significant spectator turnout, although up to 125,000 can be accommodated. Because of this, F1 moved to Barcelona following the 1991 race.
Due to the hosting of the European Grand Prix in 1994, the circuit instituted safety changes from the 1990 configuration, including a new chicane (the Senna curve) at the corner where Martin Donnelly had an appalling accident during qualifying for the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix. Jerez also hosted the 1997 European Grand Prix, which was the championship decider between Michael Schumacher and Jacques Villeneuve, who collided during the race.
During the podium celebrations of the 1997 race, Jerez's Mayor Pedro Pacheco disrupted the podium celebrations by presenting a trophy that was supposed to be presented by a dignitary from Daimler-Benz. This incident resulted in the track being temporarily banned from hosting a Grand Prix. It has never hosted another Grand Prix, but remains one of the most popular venues for winter testing.
During 2005, the track was resurfaced. It was expected that the Champ Car World Series would race there in 2008 until the series was cancelled early in the year after merging with the IndyCar Series.
The circuit currently holds pre-season Formula One testing shared with the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya.
On 2 May 2013, it was announced that the final corner would be renamed after Spanish MotoGP world champion Jorge Lorenzo.

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HJC Helmets Grand Prix de France

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05 LeMansTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 4,185 m
Width : 13 m
Corners : 14 (9 right, 5 left)
Longest Straight 674 m
Constructed 1966
Modified 2008

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Le Mans Circuit (Circuit des 24 Heures) is located close to Le Mans, approx. 237 km from the Paris - Charles de Gaulle Airport, approx. 205 km from the Paris - Orly Airport
and approx.10 km from the Le Mans City Centre.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 47o57’21.95” N, 0o12’27.30” E

HISTORY

Bugatti Circuit is a permanent race track located within Circuit des 24 Heures, named after Ettore Bugatti. The circuit uses a part of the larger circuit and a separate, purpose-built section. The sections of track on the Bugatti Circuit that are on the Circuit des 24 Heures include the Ford Chicane at the end of the lap, the pit complex, and the straight where the Dunlop Tyres bridge is located. At this point in the overlapping section of the tracks there is a left right sweep that was added for motorcycle safety in 2002. Vehicles turning to the left continue onto the Circuit des 24 Heures, toward Tertre Rouge and Mulsanne, vehicles turning to the right at La Chapelle will continue the Bugatti Circuit. The infield section features Garage Vert, a back straight, the 'S' du Garage Bleu, and Raccordement, which joins back at the Ford chacane.
The track was home base for Pescarolo Sport, founded by famous French driver Henri Pescarolo. The circuit also hosts the 24 Hours of Le Mans motorcycle race, and a round of the MotoGP Championship.

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Gran Premio d'Italia

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06 MugelloTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 5,245 m
Width : 14 m
Corners : 15 (9 right, 6 left)
Longest Straight 1,141 m
Constructed 1974
Modified -

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Mugello Circuit is located in Scarperia close to Borgo San Lorenzo, approx. 34 km from Firenze Airport, 92 km from Bologna Airport and 126 km from Pisa Airport.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 43°59'25.88"N, 11°22'12.18"E

HISTORY

The Mugello GP was revived in 1955 and from the 1964 to 1969 as a Targa Florio-like road race consisting of eight laps of 66.2 km each, including the Passo della Futa of Mille Miglia fame. The anticlockwise track passed the towns of San Piero a Sieve, Scarperia, Violla, Firenzuola, Selva, San Lucia. It counted towards the 1965, 1966 and 1967 World Sportscar Championship season. The last WC race was won by Udo Schütz and Gerhard Mitter on a Porsche 910. After two Porsche wins, the local fans could celebrate again in 1968, when the Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 driven by Luciano Bianchi, Nanni Galli and Nino Vaccarella prevailed over the Porsche driven by Rico Steinemann and Jo Siffert, and in 1969, when Arturo Merzario won with an Abarth 2000, and he won again in 1970 with the same car, where Abarth prevailed 1-2-3 with Leo Kinnunen and Gijs Van Lennep finishing 2nd and 3rd respectively. The 1970 event brought about the end of the 66 kilometer Mugello public road circuit; a seven-month-old baby was killed when local racer Spartaco Dini crashed his Alfa Romeo GTA into a group of people at the village of Firenzuola during a private test there, when the roads were open to the public (the roads were only closed on race day and for qualifying; and left open for every other day including open practice for the event). Four other people, including 2 young children were seriously injured. Although there had only been one previous fatality at the original Mugello circuit (Günther Klass in 1967), this happening put a bad stain on the whole event, and the 1970 race turned out to be the last one held on the public road circuit, which was won once again by Merzario. After this incident, Dini spent 2 months in jail, and after his time served he moved out of Italy and did not return for years.
The present-day closed Mugello circuit was constructed in 1973 and opened in 1974, about five km east from the easternmost part of the original road circuit.

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Gran Premi Monster Energy de Catalunya

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07 BarceloneTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 4,727 m
Width : 12 m
Corners : 13 (8 right, 6 left)
Longest Straight 1.047 m
Constructed 1991
Modified 1995

CIRCUIT LOCATION

Circuit de Catalunya is located 25 km north of Barcelona City Centre, approx. 40 km from the Barcelona Airport and 70 km from the Girona Airport.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 41°34'20.74"N, 2°15'21.67"E

HISTORY

The Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya was built in 1991 and began hosting the Spanish Grand Prix that same year. Construction also coincided with the Olympic Games scheduled to take place in Barcelona the next year, where the circuit acted as the start and finish line for the road team time trial cycling event. The Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya should not be confused with the Montjuïc circuit, which hosted the Spanish Grand Prix four times between 1969 and 1975 and, unlike the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, is actually located within the city of Barcelona.
Because so much testing is done at this circuit, Formula One drivers and mechanics are extremely familiar with it. This has led to criticism that drivers and mechanics are too familiar with Catalunya, reducing the amount of on-track action.
When first used, overtaking was frequent as cars could follow closely through the last two corners and slipstream down the long straight. As aerodynamic balance became more critical, this overtaking method drastically decreased as the cars were unable to follow each other through the fast final corner due to turbulence created by the leading car.The 2007 season saw the first of the two final sweepers replaced with a slow chicane in an effort to improve overtaking. However, the redesign has not yet shown any effect.
The Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya also plays host to many other racing series, including MotoGP. The chicane which was put in the penultimate turn for Formula 1 does not play a part in the track layout for Moto GP, and there are at least five points on the track (turns 1, 2, 4, 10, 14) where riders are known to overtake. As in Formula 1, turn one is arguably the most popular place for overtaking. The circuit is not known to produce copious amounts of overtaking, despite the long straights.

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Motul TT Assen

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08 AssenTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 4,542 m
Width : 14 m
Corners : 18 (12 right, 6 left)
Longest Straight 487 m
Constructed 1955
Modified 2012


CIRCUIT LOCATION

TT Circuit Assen is located south-west of Assen, near the A28 motorway from Amersfoort to Groningen, approx. 200 km from Amsterdam “Schiphol Airport”, 27 km from Groningen “Eelde Airport” and 2 km from Assen City Centre.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 52°57'32.53"N, 6°31'36.51"E

HISTORY

The original Assen track was first used for the 1925 Dutch TT (Tourist Trophy) race, held on country roads through the villages of Borger, Schoonloo and Grolloo, and organized by the Motorclub Assen en Omstreken. The brick-paved track had a length of 17.75 miles (28.57 km). The winner was Piet van Wijngaarden on a 500 cc Norton with an average speed of 91.4 kilometers per hour (56.8 mph).
In years afterwards the Dutch TT was held on a road circuit through de Haar, Barteldbocht (near Assen), Oude Tol, Hooghalen, Laaghalen and Laaghalerveen.
In 1951 the Italian Umberto Masetti took the record on a 500 cc Gilera with an average speed of 100.88 miles per hour (162.35 km/h). In 1954, Geoff Duke of Great Britain reached 106.06 miles per hour (170.69 km/h). The circuit remained unchanged until 1955, when a whole new circuit was built close to the site of the original, but less than a third of the length and much more like a modern road racing circuit.
The circuit was fundamentally redesigned again in 2006, becoming the so-called A-Style Assen TT Circuit. All alterations aside, only one section of the circuit is original; the finish line never moved.
On September 21, 2009 it was announced that a new chicane will be added, after a request from the A1GP organization, however A1GP was unable to start the 2009-'10 season and as a substitute the Superleague Formula replaced A1GP.
The current Assen race track was built in 1955, and initially had a length of 7,705 meters (4.788 mi). The current track has a length of 4,555 meters (2.830 mi) with the mixture of super fast flat-out and slow corners. The longest straight is 560 meters (0.348 mi). The curves in Assen were traditionally banked and the surface is extremely grippy, so the riders were able to drive much faster on the course than other circuits. Today these sloped or curved bends have been modified due to safety issues.
On July 6, 2004 the organization announced plans for an amusement park located to the north of the track. In 2006 the northern loop was removed and the length was shortened to 4,555 meters. The new centre is expected to be visited by 300,000 people, and the total investment is approximately € 85 million.

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GoPro Motorrad Grand Prix Deutschland

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09 SachsenringTRACK DATA

Pole position : Left
Length : 3,671 m
Width : 12 m
Corners : 13 (3 right, 10 left)
Longest Straight 700 m
Constructed 1996
Modified 2003

LOCATION

Sachsenring Circuit is located 27 km from the Chemnitz City, approx. 75 km from Halle/Leipzig Airport, 100 km from Dresden Airport and 125 km from Erfurt Airport.

GPS Circuit Entrance: 50°47'22.83"N, 12°41'9.54"E

HISTORY

The first race was held on 26 May 1927 on an 8.7 km layout on public roads, running also through the village of Hohenstein-Ernstthal itself. It was dubbed "Sachsenring" in 1937.
The East German motorcycle Grand Prix was held there from 1962 to 1971. The local two stroke MZ bikes of Zschopau were competitive during this time. The quickest lap was achieved by 15 time World Champion Giacomo Agostini on a MV Agusta with a 180 km/h average. After West German Dieter Braun won in 1971 and the East German fans sang the West German National Anthem in celebration (as is the case in sport, the winner's National Anthem is played after the event), the event was limited to East European entrants for political reasons.
In 1990, with faster Western machinery now available, racing through the village became too dangerous with some fatalities (this can be compared with the Isle of Man TT).
To accelerate redevelopment of eastern Germany in the new unified Germany, a 2.9 km (1.8 mi) short track berg corner was built in the 1990s to bring international motorsport to the newly freed eastern part of Germany. In 1996, IDM motorcycle racing and the ADAC Super Tourenwagen Cup resumed racing here. The DTM raced here in 2000, with Klaus Ludwig winning at age 51, but the DTM did not return after 2002, preferring international venues.
Since 1998, the German motorcycle Grand Prix moved to the Sachsenring from Nürburgring. In recent years, the track has been made faster and longer again, with the length now being 3670m. In 2011 the FIA GT1 World Championship will hold one of its race weekends at the Sachsenring.

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